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, right? lyndon johnson is getting sworn in on air force one. roosevelt had to go to a house in buffalo. there's one where mckinley died and one where roosevelt was sworn in and he kind of stumbled through it all, yeah i got the oath. so he didn't have his hand on the bible. he said a few words, but he became president. it reminds us that things are sometimes haphazard at inaugurations. we don't get to pre plain like we do for this one. >> president obama's first inauguration drew record crowds. how do you think it will be remembered? >> i have kids who have the place mat and on it you have presidents on it. it's all white faces and now you have the first african-american. man, was that historic. you had people pouring in here electricity in the air. it didn't matter what the speech was that year. it was about the atmospherics. this time around i think the speech the president gives is going to be more important. they're having less balls, less crowds, more enthusiasm. he can make up for that by having words that may some day be carved in marble. >> douglas brinkley.
this after 380 filibusters compared to when lyndon johnson was the senate majority leader where he had one filibuster? >> well, this is the point, right? we have a senate that's frozen, broken, doesn't work. pick your favorite adjective or vertebrae. it's not working. this is not what democracy looks like. it's only on the first day and technically we're still in the first day of the congress, two-year period that this can be done by 51 senators, meaning in this case there's 55 in the democratic caucus and we'll take 51 of them. we need all of those 51 to stand up to have a senate that actually discusses the issues of the day. and allows the president's nominations to reach the floor and allows conference committees to actually meet. so when the house and senate pass two different bills there's a way to reconcile that. none of that is happening. >> harry reid said that he has been negotiating with senate minority leader mitch mcconnell to avoid having the so-called nuclear option. i would go so far as to say does mitch mcconnell even deserve to be in the position to negotiate what the sena
in and attacked that. now, in my opinion that wasn't partisan. it was his vision of america. as lyndon johnson had a vision of the great society. it wasn't anti-republican. it was his vision. john kennedy, the new frontier. i think the president from the way i was taking it was saying i think b this is the vision america needs to go in. but it wasn't for just four years. he said we're not talking four months, four years, or 400 years. >> that's exactly right. and you played the clip talking about how the social safety net allows us to take risks and not fear the failure. other countries don't have that. i spent a lot of time in india where there was such a fear of taking on new initiatives and being entrepreneurial because there wasn't that same safety net in place. that is the progressive vision. let's be real. paul ryan, here's a guy who supports privatizing social security, voucherizing medicare. so the president is not putting up a strawman argument. these are exactly the principles that republicans support. and also republicans have never been comfortable with social security and medicare. th
of the democratic party. and yet it set in motion the events that led to the challenging of lyndon johnson. so i think unfortunately history becomes political, and we pick and choose what we refer to emphasize, but dr. king was gradual. he was slow to come to an open stance. he knew what the stakes were. he wasn't unaware. he wasn't innocent. he knew he would have trouble taking that position, and he took it forthrightly, and proudly, and stayed with it. >> john: kris let me ask you the same question. do you think that another great tragedy of dr. king's loss is he's only remembered as a civil rights icon and not as a non-violent resistence icon or labor rights icon. >> he's so much bigger than the box we tend to put him in. in some of those speeches, in the antiwar speeches he was talking about moving beyond tribe, race, class and nation. that's the kind of radical internationalism that we really don't talk about. even president obama's speech today he's saying we're really loyal not to party but to nations. well, king went far beyond that and say we're not loyal to nations. we're loyal to god.
to tell you a little secret. this is going to be my 13th inaugural. i came to the inauguration for lyndon johnson in 1964. i came with my mom. >> wow. >> next one was four years later, 1968 and that was the inauguration of richard nixon and i've covered every one of them since. >> bob, that's why we love talking to you around this time. we know it's exciting for you. it's exciting for the nation when a president takes the oath of office, but i guess if the past few weeks are any indication, president obama's second term is going to be just as challenging as the first, if not more. >> no question about that and a whole lot of what we're going to hear in the beginning is a whole lot of what we heard as last year came to a halt. the arguments over the nation's finances, the arguments we heard during the fiscal cliff, just get ready for verse 2 of the chorus of that story. it's far from done. we can also expect to hear a lot about guns and what we do about that issue. so there are a lot of people right now who are not as excited as they often when are you begin another term -- often are when
him, not being with him. frank church had voted against the vietnam war. lyndon johnson says the next time you want to damnen your district call frank church. can barack obama utilize the inherent power of that office? >> if he has personal relationships -- lyndon johnson had remarkable relationships. they knew when lyndon called lyndon meant business. the president needs to reach out a lot more. again, i know he's reached out, he's invited people over. we'd said a couple weeks ago he invited a lot of people over for spielberg to see "lincoln." >> state dinners. >> the majority leader's office called later and said yeah we got the invitation that afternoon, four hours beforehand. but you invite congressmen and senators over, one on one, they'll come. >> there is an upside to cooperation. not every battle is one of opposition. begin to reframe the image of the party with the rest of the country, number one. at the end of the day, that's what people want to see, you working with the administration. to joe's point, you don't have to agree with everything but
he utilize the power, the threat of power of the presidency the way lyndon johnson did with regard to resolutions during the course of the vietnam war? one senator voting against him, not being with him. frank church had voted against the vietnam war. lyndon johnson says the next time you want to damnen your district, call frank church. can barack obama utilize the inherent power of that office? >> if he has personal relationships -- lyndon johnson had remarkable relationships. they knew when lyndon called, lyndon meant business. the president needs to reach out a lot more. again, i know he's reached out, he's invited people over. we'd said a couple weeks ago he invited a lot of people over for spielberg to see "lincoln." >> state dinners. >> the majority leader's office called later and said, yeah, we got the invitation that afternoon, four hours beforehand. but you invite congressmen and senators over, one on one, they'll come. >> there is an upside to cooperation. not every battle is one of opposition. begin to reframe the image of the party with the rest of the country, number
states. >> the constitution of the united states. >> vice president lyndon johnson, takes the oath, which brings him together with the
estimate record was 1.2 million who came out for lbj, lyndon johnson's inaugural back in '65. we'll be right back. in america today we're running out of a vital resource we need to compete on the global stage. what we need are people prepared for the careers of our new economy. by 2025 we could have 20 million jobs without enough college graduates to fill them. that's why at devry university, we're teaming up with companies like cisco to help make sure everyone is ready with the know-how we need for a new tomorrow. [ male announcer ] make sure america's ready. make sure you're ready. at ♪ prego?! but i've been buying ragu for years. [ thinking ] i wonder what other questionable choices i've made? [ club scene music ] [ sigh of relief ] [ male announcer ] choose taste. choose prego. [ sigh of relief ] officemax can help you drive suand down.s down... use your maxperks card and get a 10-ream case of officemax multiuse paper for just 4.99 after maxperks rewards. find thousands of big deals now... at officemax. >>> welcome back to "hardball." president obama yest
. and finally, when he supports social security, medicaid and medicare, that's straight lyndon johnson, great society talk. this is a speech in the progressive tradition. at some points it's like the second inaugural of franklin roosevelt where fdr in 1937 said be proud you're an individual but there's also a collective. and you guys mentioned the word people, how often he said, we, the people. but this is, we, the people almost in a howard zimm people of america kind of way. this was about ordinary people fighting for ordinary rights, stonewall has replaced normandy. you know, selma has replaced iwo jima. there wasn't a marshal tone, this was about inclusion. >> he used the term we, and he used the term common creed over and over again throughout the speech. norah o'donnell was listening to the speech down there on the national mall. nor norah? >> and, scott, on that theme the president used the word together some seven times. a word he used just once in 2009. and i think you're right, this was in some ways a civil rights speech. because the president said, our journey is not complete. that'
lyndon johnson, john kennedy, bill clinton, or george w. bush? >> bill clinton? [ buzzer ] >> you're a winner too. >> yes, you are. >> all right, kim kardashian gets my book. so the correct answer here, president lyndon johnson. >> lyndon johnson. you might remember that famous, famous picture on air force one after president kennedy was assassinated. he was sworn in by a dallas judge, sarah hughes. >> okay. well, thank you so much. that was -- we learned a lot, and kathie lee is going to come back across the street now, and we're going to talk to a woman who knows a thing or two about money. our good friend suzy or man is with us. we're going to speak with her after this. i was living with this all-over pain. a deep, throbbing, persistent ache. my doctor diagnosed it as fibromyalgia, thought to be the result of overactive nerves that cause chronic widespread pain. lyrica is believed to calm these nerves. i learned lyrica can provide significant relief from fibromyalgia pain. and for some people, it can work in as early as the first week of treatment. so now i can do more of the t
in order to bring us into a new era. one of the things that lyndon johnson said famously is that when a president is elected, he's for six months he's a giraffe and thereafter a worm, so his great challenge is going to be how he figures out how to make the most of this time as a giraffe. >> let's go back outside to so sole ya vega. >> i'm here. hey, good afternoon. we made our way over from the pentagon where we were at the staging area and came over on a bus full of teenager matching band from tennessee. they were really excited and we walked our way through the mall here and made our way close to the capitol. you can see a lot of the crowd is dissipating. a lot are headed over to that paid we'll see later this afternoon. we heard all of our friends, david muir and bill weir talking about the excitement and the level of excitement you can feel just walking through this crowd. it's so palpable. one woman i just met while making my way over stopped me in my tracks during the invocation, she literally had tears streaming down her face and i said why are you so emotional? she said my gra
in this senate? the contrast is enormous from the time that lyndon b. johnson was president of the senate. lyndon b. johnson for six years presiding over this body saw one filibuster. and harry reid in his six years presiding over this senate has seen 391 filibusters. and let me convey that even when you have the votes to end a filibuster, the fact that it is launched creates enormous paralysis. imagine you're debating a bill and you continue debating through the end of the week and you come in the following monday and you debate and nobody has anything to say and so somebody says, "i ask unanimous consent that we have a final vote on this bill." now, you see, we don't have a previous question, motion on this floor, so one has to ask for unanimous consent. any of a hundred senators can weigh in and say "no." and when they they weigh in and say "no" on that monday, on tuesday, a petition is put forward with 16 senators saying, let's have a vote on closing debate. and that vote can't happen until thursday, under the rules. and if it's successful on a thursday, you have to have 30 hours more of deba
john f. kennedy, george h.w. bush, lyndon johnson, president jimmy carter and we'll wrap up the night at 11 eastern with george w. bush's speech. starting tonight at 8:00 p.m. eastern on c-span. >> why did you write a book about your experience? >> it was an important part of history. i felt it should be brought to bear. there had been some other accounts of the crisis i thought were not completely accurate in terms of what we did and what i did. so i thought it was important for the historical record to present our perspective and for people to understand there were different policy choices and options, disagreements. and that if we want to prevent another crisis from happening again, i really felt the public itself needed to engage more on financial reform, educate themselves better. make it an issue with their elected officials. so i have some policy recommendations at the end of it that i hope people will look at. >> the former head of the deposit corporation on the government's worst financial crisis. her book is bull by the horns sunday at 8:00 on c-span's q&a. yournl continues.
laden, surely passing civil rights legislation as lyndon johnson was able to do and before, that surely defeating the nazis was a much more formidable task than taking on the gun lobby? >> where is the media outrage? when bob schieffer of cbs compares obama's gun initiatives to defeating hitler, in other words, taking on the nra is the equivalent of taking on adolf hitler. now is there room for that in our discourse today? why is that not an example of just over the top defamation, exaggeration, insulting, not to mention the lack of civility? jon: all right, judy. take that on, does he have a report? >> i think rush limbaugh talking about over the top is a bit much. i do think that, you know, what bob schieffer was saying, this is a president who has taken on tough issues just as others have taken on tough challenges. i do think that comparing even indirectly, the sandy hook massacre with the defeat of the nazis is a bit much and i also was struck by bob schieffer's assertion that massacre was the worst day in the country's history since 9/11. that is kind of also a very sweeping statem
nixon from 1969. john kennedy in 1961. george bush at 10:00 eastern at 1989. lyndon johnson from 1965. the jakarta from 1977. at 11:00, george w. bush and his 2001 inauguration. -- lyndon johnson -- jimmy carter in 1977. that is coming up at 8:00 eastern tomorrow night on c- span. our inauguration coverage kicks off this weekend as president obama begins his second term. the official swearing-in ceremony is sunday at the white house. we will have live coverage. we will also include your phone calls. we will begin with a look back at president obama's 2009 inaugural address. then on monday, the public inaugural ceremonies with the swearing in at noon, the capitol luncheon, and a parade down pennsylvania avenue. coverage begins at 7:00 eastern here on c-span, c-span radio, and join the conversation throughout the day on facebook and twitter. >> the greatest honor history can be so is the title of peacemaker. this honor now beckons america the chance to help lead the world of last out of the valley of turmoil and on to that high ground of peace that man has dreamed of since t
tell you, brian, this is -- it's unreal to me. it is unbelievable. as lyndon johnson would say it's like history and fate coming together. for this president, this african-american, to be inaugura inaugurated for a second time on martin luther king day and can look out and see the likeness of martin luther king. to see jefferson, to see lincoln. it is just unreal. 150 years after the emancipation proclamation, almost 50 years after the march on washington, dr. king delivered the i have a dream speech, it says something about the distance we have come, the progress we have made and for him to make a speech that was so inclusive, it was about black people, white people, asian americans, latino, native americans, straight, gay, that we're one people. we're one family. we are one house. we all live in the american house. >> well, about that last point, congressman, we want to let you go and enjoy your lunch, we all do live in the same house and there you are. you have gone from the struggle earlier in your life to a warrior in the house of representatives. you have got an anxious amer
, 1969, richard nixon, john f. kennedy in 1961. george h.w. bush in 1989, lyndon johnson from 1965, president jimmy carter in 1977, and we will wrap up the night at 11:00 eastern with president george w. bush speech from 19 -- from 2001. >> i barack hussein obama do solemnly swear that i will execute the office of president of the an ad states faithfully -- >> when chief justice john roberts administered the oath to barack obama on january 20, 2009, there was a major problem. roberts was supposed to say "that i will faithfully execute the office of president of united states. then barack obama stops, paused, smiled, as if to say, "c'mon, man, this is my big day, you got to get this right." unfortunately, he did not get it right, so the very next night in the white house, they did it again. this time roberts used notes which he had not used the first time, and they got it right. >> the history of democracy's big day, monday at 8:00 a.m. part of a three-day holiday "book tv."c-span's >> the house in for a brief protest for a session this afternoon. party leaders have been sounding ou
lyndon johnson interpreted his mandate in 1964 as a blank check in vietnam. that is one of the great dangers that confronts presidents. i did not think there is a second term curse. i think there are a number of factors. i think the word mandate should be removed from the white house dictionary. in a polarized area, presidents have a tendency to over interpret. host: let me add, this iconic photograph of president bill clinton, hugging monocle and skin. only the second president -- monica lewinsky. only the second president to face impeachment. guest: we have been told by people who should know that president clinton was willing to use some of the political capital he had. he won a significant, decisive victory over bob dole in 1996. he was prepared to move on entitlements, the so-called third rail of american politics, which would have required him spending a lot of political capital. then when the whole scandal broke, that was no longer a viable option. host: let me share with you this story from "the washington post,." there is one sentence from this article i want you to react to
lyndon johnson's legislative genius to process forward, beat back resistance and over, what seem to be an unshakable logjam. in short, in our lifetime we observed enough nontrivial policy change to recognize that the iron grip of static coal forces can be shattered and policy can progress. in the next few weeks we can anticipate and hope that the debate over the effect of regulation of guns and the appropriate balance between individual rights and civic obligations will command sustained and serious attention from our political leadership. advocates will mobilize as lobbyists apply to cases, and politicians will fight over the issues. we know that. and in this unruly mix, universities like ours can and will discharge a critical role providing principle holdings for this debate. here at johns hopkins, our scholars have been investigating the public health affects of gun violence for well over two decades. for the past 17 years, the center for gun policy and research, as visited by our colleague him has provided a home for the study, producing nationally recognized research and rec
kennedy in 1961. george w. bush in 19 99. lyndon johnson that from 1965. jimmy carter from 1977. we will wrap up with george w. bush from 2001. starting tonight at 8:00 pm on c-span. >> i barack hussein obama do solemnly swear -- , --[no audio]>> the official swearing ceremony at the white house before noon eastern. our coverage includes your phone calls and a look back at the 2009 presidential inaugural address. the public and inaugural ceremony will be swearing in at noon eastern at the us capitol and other festivities, including the capitol luncheon and parade. live coverage begins at 7:00 a.m. eastern time. join the conversation by phone, facebook, and on twitter. >> you can see the crews finishing up work between the white house and the capitol getting ready for the inauguration. you can see in front of the white house off of the inaugural parade on monday. some of the finishing touches are going up. there is a presidential seal attached to a heated glassed in area. that is where president obama and michelle obama will watch the parade. the city of washington has spent $6.5 mil
. bush, lyndon johnson, jimmy carter, and george w. bush. >> by barack hussain obama do solemnly swear -- >> this weekend, president obama begins his second term. sunday the official swearing-in ceremony live before noon. it begins with a look back at the 2009 inaugural address at 10:30 a.m. eastern. monday, the soaring and at noon eastern at the u.s. capitol and other festivities including the capitol lunch and and the parade. all the coverage begins at 7:00 eastern time on c-span, c-span radio, and join the conversation by telephone, facebook, and twitter. >> our web site will have added features including video feeds from the spin cruise, video on demand of the major events -- it c-span crews, video on demand of the major events at president george h. the the bush was inaugurated on to the rate 20, 1989. he was ronald reagan's vice president ford two terms. president bush was one and using the same bible as george washington. this is about 25 minutes. >> i george herbert walker bush is always where -- >> i, george herbert walker bush, do so
, lyndon b. johnson in 1963. james in brandon, florida on our republican line. good morning. caller: good morning. thank you for taking my call. i wanted to ask the country to pray for our president obama -- i am a republican, and i voted republican this year. that was to my commitment to the republican party. i am very disappointed with my party. i do not like the direction they are taking. to be honest with you, i do not like the fact that they are not cooperating in the house or any other place with democrats or with president obama. i would ask the president if he would open upper a new investigation on the 9/11 attacks on this country. i am unsatisfied with the commission report that was put out. host: that was james in brandon, florida. you can see on the capital, five large flags hanging down. the explanation of the five different flags they had hanging down -- this is a congressional report. framed against the black -- the backdrop -- the backdrop of red, white and blue -- we have at ross flag with starch -- stars are arranged in the circle. the next two flags are the flags the u.
Search Results 0 to 30 of about 31 (some duplicates have been removed)